Historical beliefs and the perception of threat in Northeast Asia: Colonialism, the tributary system, and China-Japan-Korea relations in the twenty-first century

Peter Hays Gries, Qingmin Zhang, Yasuki Masui, Yong Wook Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Historical controversies continue to plague northeast Asian politics today, with Chinese and Koreans protesting Japanese history textbooks and Japanese politicians' visits to Yasukuni Shrine, and Koreans protesting Chinese claims that the ancient Kingdom of Goguryo was Chinese, not Korean. Yet, there is little empirical research exploring what, if any, impact historical beliefs have on threat perception and foreign policy preferences in northeast Asia today. On the basis of surveys of Chinese, Japanese, and South Korean university students, this paper explores the relationships among beliefs about the past, perceived threat in the present, and foreign policy preferences for the future. Results and their implications for northeast Asian security are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-265
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Relations of the Asia-Pacific
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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