Hollow-fibre bioreactors compared to batch and chemostat culture for the production of a recombinant toxoid by a marine Vibrio

J. R. Lloyd, T. R. Hirst, A. W. Bunch

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Bioreactor selection is important for maximising the productivity of recombinant organisms. In this paper a comparison is made between growth and recombinant protein synthesis in three types of bioreactor containing a marine Vibrio capable of heterologous expression and secretion of the non- toxic B-subunit pentamer of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, EtxB. The heterologous gene was located on the plasmid pMMB68. Resistance to carbenicillin was used to select for plasmid-containing cells. In batch and continuous culture, volumetric productivities were highest when cells were grown in the presence of carbenicillin. Without antibiotic selection, the highest volumetric productivity (9.4 mg EtxB-1 h-1) was observed in hollow-fibre bioreactors, and the production phase could be maintained for over 50 h. The highest specific productivity under these conditions was found in batch culture, but the maximal production phase was only of 5 h duration. In hollow-fibre reactors the type of fibre used significantly affected productivity, both with regards to the maintenance of reactor integrity and by allowing passage of the recombinant toxoid through the selectively permeable membrane. Where contamination of the product with carbenicillin is to be avoided, these bioreactors are superior to batch or continuous culture.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)155-161
    Number of pages6
    JournalApplied microbiology and biotechnology
    Volume48
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

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