How the Social Sciences can Help Climate Change Policy: Extraordinary Lecture and Exhibition of Ideas

Nicola Spurling (Other), The Social Change Climate Change Working Party (Photographer)

    Research output: Non-textual formExhibition

    Abstract

    If there is to be any effective response to climate change, substantially new ways of living are urgently required. Forms of intervention based on theories of rational action, lifestyle choice and human behaviour are unlikely to catalyse entrenchedhabits and practices at the rate required to mitigate and adapt to climate change.The “social change, climate change working party” was a cross-sector, cross-disciplinary working group that met for three 2-day workshops in 2009-2010 to develop and debate significantly new ways of conceptualising and promoting sustainable transitions in ordinary but environmentally significant routines like those of heating, cooling, washing, eating, lighting and moving around. Further information about the working parties is available at http://www.lancs.ac.uk/staff/shove/transitionsinpractice/party.htm.The Extraordinary Lecture and Exhibition were the finale of this project, and attracted an cross-sector, multi-disciplinary audience of c. 200. A recording of the lecture, the exhibition posters and postcards, can be viewed at http://www.lancs.ac.uk/staff/shove/lecture/lecture.htmThe project formed part of Elizabeth Shove's ESRC-funded Climate Change Leadership Fellowship. I contributed as Fellowship Assistant and member of the Working Party.
    Original languageEnglish
    PublisherNo publisher name
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    Eventother; 2011-01-17; 2011-01-17 - The British Library
    Duration: 17 Jan 201117 Jan 2011

    Keywords

    • climate change
    • practice theory

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