Identification and characterization of a novel acidotolerant Fe(III)-reducing bacterium from a 3000-year-old acidic rock drainage site

Laura K. Adams, Christopher Boothman, Jonathan R. Lloyd

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Acidic, ochre-precipitating springs at Mam Tor, East Midlands, UK, are analogous to sites impacted by acid mine drainage over prolonged periods of time, and were studied for the presence of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. From enrichment cultures inoculated with Mam Tor sediment, a facultative anaerobe capable of reducing Fe(III) at pH values as low as three was isolated. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that this bacterium is a close relative of Serratia species and not previously shown to respire using Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. Direct cell counts of the isolate grown with Fe(III)-NTA coupled with protein assays suggest that this bacterium is able to conserve energy for growth through Fe(III) reduction. © 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)151-157
    Number of pages6
    JournalFEMS microbiology letters
    Volume268
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

    Keywords

    • Acid mine drainage
    • Acidophile
    • Microbial Fe(III) reduction
    • Serratia

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