Impact of Charles Bonnet Syndrome on visually impaired older adults’ ability to engage in physical activity: a scoping review

Katharine Fisher, Caroline Sanders, Emma Stanmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Charles Bonnet Syndrome (CBS) is a condition associated with sight loss, characterised by vivid, spontaneous visual hallucinations. Currently, it is unclear whether CBS presents challenges to participation in physical activities, in addition to barriers attributed to sight loss alone. The purpose of this scoping review was to establish the extent of the literature, and gaps in the knowledge base, concerning the impact of CBS on older adults’ engagement in physical activities. Review conduct was informed by Arksey and O’Malley and Levac et al’s scoping review methodologies. Six academic databases were searched during May 2021, yielding 2709 articles: 8 articles met eligibility criteria. Two additional sources were located via a reference check of included papers, and stakeholder consultation. Quantitative cross-sectional studies (n=3) indicate that CBS may interfere with ability to move around, whilst qualitative sources (case report/series n=6; autobiography n=1) show that sudden presentation of hallucinations in a person’s pathway, or threatening content, may jeopardise safety whilst walking. Moving to avoid a hallucination could present a fall risk if attention is diverted from environmental hazards. One case report stated that CBS did not affect personal care activities. Due to a limited evidence base, further empirical research is needed to achieve a comprehensive understanding about how CBS affects older adults’ participation in physical activities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Visual Impairment
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Charles Bonnet Syndrome
  • sight loss
  • older people
  • Falls
  • visual hallucinations
  • physical activity

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