Interaction of the La-related protein Slf1 with colliding ribosomes maintains translation of oxidative-stress responsive mRNAs.

Martin Jennings, Priya Srivastava, Christopher J. Kershaw, David Talavera, Christopher Grant, Graham D Pavitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In response to oxidative stress cells reprogram gene expression to enhance levels of antioxidant enzymes and promote survival. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the polysome-interacting La-related proteins (LARPs) Slf1 and Sro9 aid adaptation of protein synthesis during stress by undetermined means. To gain insight in their mechanisms of action in stress responses, we determined LARP mRNA binding positions in stressed and unstressed cells. Both proteins bind within coding regions of stress-regulated antioxidant enzyme and other highly translated mRNAs in both optimal and stressed conditions. LARP interaction sites are framed and enriched with ribosome footprints suggesting ribosome-LARP-mRNA complexes are identified. Although stress-induced translation of antioxidant enzyme mRNAs is attenuated in slf1Δ, these mRNAs remain on polysomes. Focusing further on Slf1, we find it binds to both monosomes and disomes following RNase treatment. slf1Δ reduces disome enrichment during stress and alters programmed ribosome frameshifting rates. We propose that Slf1 is a ribosome-associated translational modulator that stabilises stalled/collided ribosomes, prevents ribosome frameshifting and so promotes translation of a set of highly-translated mRNAs that together facilitate cell survival and adaptation to stress.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5755–5773
JournalNucleic Acids Res
Volume51
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jun 2023

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