Investigating prescribing errors in the emergency department of a large governmental hospital in Jordan

Derar H. Abdel‐qader, Ahmad Z. Al Meslamani, Asma' A. El‐shara', Najlaa Saadi Ismael, Abdullah Albassam, Penny J. Lewis, Salim Hamadi, Hazim Saleem Abbas, Nadia Al Mazrouei, Osama Mohamed Ibrahim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background
Although prescribing errors (PEs) are the most common type of medication errors and cause morbidity and mortality, they have been rarely studied.

Objective
The study aimed to investigate PEs incidence, types, severity, causes, predictors, pharmacists' interventions accepted by doctors and computer‐related errors.

Setting
This study was conducted in the emergency department of the largest governmental hospital in Jordan.

Method
This was a retrospective observational 4‐week study. A validated definition of PEs was adopted, and errors were identified by direct observation of all prescriptions. Structured interviews with doctors to assess the causes of errors were conducted within three days of the prescription date; the severity of PEs was rated by a committee.

Main outcome measure
Prescribing errors incidence, types, severity, causes, predictors, pharmacists' interventions accepted by doctors and computer‐related errors.

Results
For 1330 patients, 3470 medication orders were recorded. Almost one in five patients had PEs (n = 288, 21.65%), and the total number of medication orders for patients who had errors was 610. The PEs incidence was 12.5% (95% CI 11.4%–3.5% (n = 450/3597)). Analgesics were the most common medications associated with PEs (232/610, 38.03%). The top two types of PEs detected were wrong drug (165/450, 36.6%) and wrong dose (142/450, 31.5%) respectively. Most PEs were clinically significant errors (342/450, 76%). Doctors refused pharmacists' interventions on their orders in 132 (45.8%) prescriptions. The most common cause of errors was poor skills of doctors in electronic prescribing system (266/450, 59%). Predictors of PEs were the following: drug with multiple dosage forms (OR 2.998; 95% CI 1.41–6.34; P = 0.004) and a prescription with polypharmacy (OR 1.685; 95% CI 1.25%–2.26%; P = 0.001).

Conclusion
A national approach for observing, intervening on and correcting PEs is necessary to improve patient safety.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research
Early online date4 Aug 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Aug 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Investigating prescribing errors in the emergency department of a large governmental hospital in Jordan'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this