Investigation and medical management of trigeminal neuralgia by consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the British Isles

M. N. Pemberton, P. S. Dewi, I. Hindle, M. H. Thornhill

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Trigeminal neuralgia is an extremely painful affliction of the face that is treated by various specialists including oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Some aspects of its management remain controversial, including screening for secondary trigeminal neuralgia, and the monitoring of treatment with carbamazepine. There is, however, little information available about current practice. A postal questionnaire was sent to 254 fellows of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS) about various aspects of the management of trigeminal neuralgia. One hundred and seventy nine replies (70%) were received. Orofacial and cranial nerve examinations were undertaken by the majority of surgeons, but most did not routinely arrange computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for all patients, nor did they refer the patient to a neurologist. In contrast with current recommendations, warnings about the adverse effects of carbamazepine were given by only a few surgeons, while most routinely monitored full blood counts. © 2001 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)114-119
    Number of pages5
    JournalBritish Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
    Volume39
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

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