Is personal income associated with attitudes toward climate change risk? A moderated mediation analysis for the UK from 2009 to 2020

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Abstract

This study investigates the effect of personal income on attitudes toward climate change risk, considering the mediator of responsibility attribution for climate change and the moderator of educational attainment. Using a latent growth curve model applied to data from the UK Household Longitudinal Study dataset from 2009 to 2020, this study indicated that personal income growth heightens the likelihood of expressing concern about climate change while reducing the propensity for holding sceptical or paradoxical attitudes over time. Attributing climate change to personal behaviour mediated the income-attitude relationship. Significant differences in the mediation effect were observed between individuals who had received a university education and those who had not, even after controlling for covariates such as age, sex, political affiliation and employment status. These findings suggest that climate campaign emphasizing responsibility attribution can address attitude disparities across income and education strata, further promoting sustainable climate action and mitigation.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSustainable Development
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 4 Apr 2024

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