Isopentenol utilization pathway for the production of linalool in Escherichia coli using an improved bacterial linalool/nerolidol synthase

Clara A. Ferraz, Nicole G. H. Leferink, Iaroslav Kosov, Nigel Scrutton

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Abstract

Linalool is a monoterpenoid used as a fragrance ingredient, and is a promising source for alternative fuels. Synthetic biology offers attractive alternative production methods compared to extraction from natural sources and chemical synthesis. Linalool/nerolidol synthase (bLinS) from Streptomyces clavuligerus is a bifunctional enzyme, producing linalool as well as the sesquiterpenoid nerolidol when expressed in engineered Escherichia coli harbouring a precursor terpenoid pathway such as the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. Here we identified two residues important for substrate selection by bLinS, L72 and V214, where the introduction of bulkier residues results in variants with reduced nerolidol formation. Terpenoid production using canonical precursor pathways is usually limited by numerous and highly regulated enzymatic steps. Here we compared the canonical MVA pathway to the non‐canonical isoprenol utilization (IU) pathway to produce linalool using the optimised bLinS variant. The IU pathway uses isoprenol and prenol to produce linalool in only five steps. Adjusting substrate, plasmid system, inducer concentration, and cell strain directs the flux towards monoterpenoids. Our integrated approach, combining enzyme engineering with flux control using the artificial IU pathway, resulted in high purity production of the commercially attractive monoterpenoid linalool, and will guide future efforts towards efficient optimisation of terpenoid production in engineered microbes.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCHEMBIOCHEM
Early online date3 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 May 2021

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