Joint modeling of parentally reported and physician-confirmed wheeze identifies children with persistent troublesome wheezing

D C Belgrave, Angela Simpson, A Semic-Jusufagic, C S Murray, I Buchan, A Pickles, A Custovic

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    Abstract

    Background Previous studies have suggested the presence of different childhood wheeze phenotypes through statistical modeling based on parentally reported wheezing. Objective We sought to investigate whether joint modeling of observations from both medical records and parental reports helps to more accurately define wheezing disorders during childhood and whether incorporating information from medical records better characterizes severity. Methods In a population-based birth cohort (n = 1184), we analyzed data from 2 sources (parentally reported current wheeze at 4 follow-ups and physician-confirmed wheeze from medical records in each year from birth to age 8 years) to determine classes of children who differ in wheeze trajectories. We tested the validity of these classes by examining their relationships with objective outcomes (lung function, airway hyperreactivity, and atopy), asthma medication, and severe exacerbations. Results Longitudinal latent class modeling identified a 5-class model that best described the data. We assigned classes as follows: no wheezing (53.3%), transient early wheeze (13.7%), late-onset wheeze (16.7%), persistent controlled wheeze (13.1%), and persistent troublesome wheeze (PTW; 3.2%). Longitudinal trajectories of atopy and lung function differed significantly between classes. Patients in the PTW class had diminished lung function and more hyperreactive airways compared with all other classes. We observed striking differences in exacerbations, hospitalizations, and unscheduled visits, all of which were markedly higher in patients in the PTW class compared with those in the other classes. For example, the risk of exacerbation was much higher in patients in the PTW class compared with patients with persistent controlled wheeze (odds ratio [OR], 3.58; 95% CI, 1.27-10.09), late-onset wheeze (OR, 15.92; 95% CI, 5.61-45.15), and transient early wheeze (OR, 12.24; 95% CI, 4.28-35.03). Conclusion We identified a novel group of children with persistent troublesome wheezing, who have markedly different outcomes compared with persistent wheezers with controlled disease.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)575-583
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
    Volume132
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

    Keywords

    • Childhood asthma
    • Asthma endotypes
    • MWD
    • NW
    • OR
    • PCW
    • PTW
    • sIgE
    • SPT
    • sRaw
    • STRA
    • TEW
    • Wheeze phenotypes
    • Longitudinal analysis
    • AHR
    • BIC
    • FVC
    • GP
    • ICS
    • LOW

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