Learning through maps: Functional significance of topographic organization in primary sensory cortex

Mathew E. Diamond, Rasmus S. Petersen, Justin A. Harris

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The presence of 'maps' in sensory cortex is a hallmark of the mammalian nervous system, but the functional significance of topographic organization has been called into question by physiological studies claiming that patterns of neural behavioral activity transcend topographic boundaries. This paper discusses recent behavioral and physiological studies suggesting that, when animals or human subjects learn perceptual tasks, the neural modifications associated with the learning are distributed according to the spatial arrangement of the primary sensory cortical map. Topographical cortical representations of sensory events, therefore, appear to constitute a true structural framework for information processing and plasticity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)64-68
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Neurobiology
    Volume41
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

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