Levels of motivation and readiness for treatment aligned with criminal justice referral and coercion among substance users in England

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Abstract

Objective: Motivation and readiness for substance misuse treatment predict treatment retention and successful treatment outcomes, but may be lower among substance users coerced into treatment. We tested for differences associated with legal involvement and with client perceptions of coercion among individuals entering drug misuse treatment in England.
Method: Data collection involved 342 treatment agencies. Measures of motivation and readiness for treatment were taken from the Circumstances, Motivation and Readiness (CMR) scale. Referral source was ordered to represent level of legal involvement and conditions. Perceived coercion was defined by a CMR item. Linear regression models, adjusting for client complexity, tested for differences in motivation and readiness by these measures.
Results: Levels of motivation and readiness did not differ according to level of legal conditions (Coeff -0.38, 95% CI -1.65 to 0.88). Motivation was inversely associated with perceived coercion (Coeff. -0.28, 95% CI -0.05, -0.50, p=0.014).
Conclusions:
At the point of treatment entry, criminal justice referral and aligned conditions have no impact on levels of motivation to achieve positive treatment outcomes. Concerns around lower levels of motivation are better focussed on those who perceive themselves as coerced rather than those whose referral carries a level of legal condition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)884-888
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Volume78
Issue number6
Early online date31 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Drug treatment
  • motivation
  • readiness
  • Coercion
  • Criminal justice

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