Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: new mechanism of heart disease

Carlos C H Cheung, C.Y. Soon, Chia Lin Chuang, Anthony R J Phillips, Shaoping Zhang, Garth Cooper

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Cu plays crucial roles in many biological processes including anti-oxidant defence, oxygen utilization, energy metabolism, and the cross-linking of collagen and elastin. It is an essential trace utrient in all known organisms, but excess free Cu (present as CuII in the extracellular space) is toxic. After absorption from the gut, it becomes bound to Cu-transporting proteins which deliver it to cells, where it is taken up via specific cell-membrane Cu transporters/channels [1,2]. Cu atoms are subsequently delivered to specific intracellular destinations via chaperones, thus activating Cu enzymes which catalyse numerous crucial biochemical reactions [3]. Cardiac tissue requires a substantial amount of Cu to sustain oxidative phosphorylation and generate the large amounts of ATP required for muscle contraction as well as peptide hormone biogenesis, protection against oxidative stress, and other critical functions [4,5].
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)62-76
    Number of pages14
    JournalBiochemical Pharmacology
    Volume97
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Keywords

    • Diabetic cardiomyopathy Cardiac failure Diastolic dysfunction Coronary arteries Coronary vasoconstriction Left-ventricular dysfunction

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