Marrow stromal cells from patients affected by MPS I differentially support haematopoietic progenitor cell development

M. A. Baxter, R. F. Wynn, L. Schyma, D. K. Holmes, J. E. Wraith, L. J. Fairbairn, I. Bellantuono

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Bone marrow transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients affected by MPS I (Hurler syndrome), but a high incidence of rejection limits the success of this treatment. The deficiency of α-L-iduronidase (EC 1.2.3.76), one of the enzymes responsible for the degradation of glycosaminoglycans, results in accumulation of heparan and dermatan sulphate in these patients. Heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate are known to be important components of the bone marrow microenvironment and critical for haematopoietic cell development. In this study we compared the ability of marrow stromal cells from MPS I patients and healthy donors to support normal haematopoiesis in Dexter-type long term culture. We found an inverse stroma/supernatant ratio in the number of clonogenic progenitors, particularly the colony-forming unit granulocyte-machrophage in MPS I cultures when compared to normal controls. No alteration in the adhesion of haematopoietic cells to the stroma of MPS I patients was found, suggesting that the altered distribution in the number of clonogenic progenitors is probably the result of an accelerated process of differentiation and maturation. The use of α-L-iduronidase gene-corrected marrow stromal cells re-established normal haematopoiesis in culture, suggesting that correction of the bone marrow microenvironment with competent enzyme prior to transplantation might help establishment of donor haematopoiesis. © SSIEM and Springer 2005.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1045-1053
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Inherited Metabolic Disease
    Volume28
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

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