Mindfulness in schools: an exploration of teachers’ perceptions of mindfulness-based interventions

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Abstract

Evidence suggests that mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) offer the potential for addressing a wide range of both teacher and pupil stressors, yet there is very little evidence in examining teacher’s perceptions of MBIs, as important stakeholders in this context. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 10 primary and secondary teachers from Northern England. The purpose was to explore perceived understanding, acceptability, and the potential barriers and facilitators for the implementation of MBIs in schools. Building on extant literature, the crucial yet often ignored role of social validity associated with programme implementation was also examined. Findings suggest teachers do not have a collective understanding of mindfulness. Implementation barriers were identified alongside suggestions for how these could potentially be overcome. Overall, teachers appeared positive and willing to deliver MBIs for the benefits of both teacher and pupil outcomes. A number of recommendations for the implementation of MBIs are presented alongside these findings.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPastoral Care in Education
Early online date9 Feb 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Feb 2020

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