More is not necessarily better: Examining the nature of the temporal reference memory component in timing

Luke A. Jones, J. H. Wearden

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    Abstract

    Three experiments compared the timing performance of humans on a modified temporal generalization task with 1,3, or 5 presentations of the standard duration. In all three experiments subjects received presentations of a standard duration at the beginning of a trial block and then had to judge whether each of a number of comparison stimuli was or was not the standard. The duration of the standard changed between blocks. The three experiments varied the experimental design (between or within subjects), task difficulty (how closely the comparison stimuli were spaced around the standards), and presence or absence of feedback on performance accuracy. Number of presentations of the standard never affected the proportion of identifications of the standard when it was presented, nor other features of the temporal generalization gradients observed. The implications for the operation of reference memories within the scalar timing system were explored via models that made different assumptions about how the individual presentations of the standard were stored and used.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)321-343
    Number of pages22
    JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Section B: Comparative and Physiological Psychology
    Volume56
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2003

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