Mucopolysaccharidosis type I, unique structure of accumulated heparan sulfate and increased N-sulfotransferase activity in mice lacking α-L-iduronidase

Rebecca J. Holley, Audrey Deligny, Wei Wei, H. Angharad Watson, Milady R. Niñonuevo, Anders Dagälv, Julie A. Leary, Brian W. Bigger, Lena Kjellén, Catherine L R Merry

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) diseases are characterized by accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) due to deficiencies in lysosomal enzymes responsible for GAG breakdown. Using a murine model of MPSI Hurler (MPSIH), we have quantified the heparan sulfate (HS) accumulation resulting from α-L-iduronidase (Idua) deficiency. HS levels were significantly increased in liver and brain tissue from 12-week-old Idua -/- mice by 87- and 20-fold, respectively. In addition, HS chains were shown to contain significantly increasedN-, 2-O-, and 6-O-sulfation. Disaccharide compositional analyses also uncovered an HS disaccharide uniquely enriched in MPSIH, representing the terminal iduronic acid residue capping the non-reducing end of the HS chain, where no further degradation can occur in the absence of Idua. Critically, we identified that excess HS, some of which is colocalized to the Golgi secretory pathway, acts as a positive regulator of HS-sulfation, increasing the N-sulfotransferase activity of HS-modifying N-deacetylase/N- sulfotransferase enzymes. This mechanism may have severe implications during disease progression but, now identified, could help direct improved therapeutic strategies. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)37515-37524
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
    Volume286
    Issue number43
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 28 Oct 2011

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