Mutant p53 promotes RCP-dependent chemoresistance coinciding with increased delivery of P-glycoprotein to the plasma membrane.

Yannick Von Grabowiecki, Patricia Muller

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Abstract

TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in cancers. Mutations lead to loss of p53 expression or expression of a mutant protein. Mutant p53 proteins commonly lose wild-type function, but can also acquire novel functions in promoting metastasis and chemoresistance. Previously, we uncovered a role for Rab-coupling protein (RCP) in mutant p53-dependent invasion. RCP promotes endosomal recycling and signalling of integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. In a screen to identify novel RCP-interacting proteins, we discovered P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Thus, we hypothesised that mutant p53 could promote chemoresistance through RCP-dependent recycling of P-gp. The interaction between RCP and P-gp was verified endogenously and loss of RCP or mutant p53 rendered cells more sensitive to cisplatin and etoposide. In mutant p53 cells we detected an RCP-dependent delivery of P-gp to the plasma membrane upon drug treatment and decreased retention of P-gp substrates. A co-localisation of P-gp and RCP was seen in mutant p53 cells, but not in p53-null cells upon chemotherapeutic exposure. In conclusion, mutant p53 expression enhanced co-localisation of P-gp and RCP to allow for rapid delivery of P-gp to the plasma membrane and increased resistance to chemotherapeutics.
Original languageEnglish
Article number207
JournalCELL DEATH & DISEASE
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Feb 2021

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Manchester Cancer Research Centre

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