Number of bodily symptoms predicts outcome more accurately than health anxiety in patients attending neurology, cardiology, and gastroenterology clinics

Judy Jackson, Maggie Fiddler, Navneet Kapur, Adrian Wells, Barbara Tomenson, Francis Creed

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: In consecutive new outpatients, we aimed to assess whether somatization and health anxiety predicted health care use and quality of life 6 months later in all patients or in those without demonstrable abnormalities. Method: On the first clinic visit, participants completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ), the Health Anxiety Questionnaire (HAQ), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Outcome was assessed as: (a) the number of medical consultations over the subsequent 6 months, extracted from medical records, and (b) Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF36) physical component score 6 months after index clinic visit. Results: A total of 295 patients were recruited (77% response rate), and medical consultation data were available for 275. The number of bodily symptoms was associated with both outcomes in linear fashion (P
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)357-363
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of psychosomatic research
    Volume60
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

    Keywords

    • Health care utilization
    • Health-related quality of life
    • Hypochondriasis
    • Medically unexplained symptoms
    • Outcome
    • Somatization

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