On surviving suicide in South India – exploring support mechanisms from the perspectives of survivors and service providers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The suicide rate in India (15.84) currently exceeds the global average (11.23) making suicide a significant public health concern. Although suicides in India are debated on medico-legal, socio-cultural, economic and political fronts, the help that is offered to people during times of crisis, before and after the attempt is very minimal. The paper aims to explore support mechanisms from the perspectives of 15 survivors, eight mental health professionals and seven traditional healers in south India. The data were analysed thematically and explored using Bourdieu’s theoretical concepts. Data indicated medical intervention as a prominent method with reservations towards psychological therapies. Reliance upon religious and traditional healing systems was culturally accepted source of support. The social and cultural power experienced by service users and service providers demonstrated a potential to influence behaviours, attitudes, decisions, approaches to services and strategies for support.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Early online date6 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'On surviving suicide in South India – exploring support mechanisms from the perspectives of survivors and service providers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this