One size fits all? Racial and cultural considerations around using acceptance and commitment therapy with people who have experienced brain injury

Rosco Kasujja, Ndidi Boakye, Nadine Mirza, Will Curvis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) approaches may play a useful role in supporting people following brain injury. However, these approaches may not be appropriate for all – geographical, racial, ethnic and cultural barriers and disparities in accessing rehabilitation and treatment exist across the world. This chapter has been written by professionals working in the UK and Uganda; the authors will discuss pertinent issues in their countries to highlight the breadth of the challenges faced in terms of access to and availability of services supporting people following brain injury. This chapter will consider some of the potential challenges of applying ACT principles, considering issues of culture, language, spirituality and religion at institutional and individual levels. We will discuss the importance of working in a flexible and culturally sensitive way, alongside culturally competent peers within communities.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAcceptance and Commitment Therapy and Brain Injury
Subtitle of host publicationA Practical Guide for Clinicians
EditorsWill Curvis, Abigail Methley
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter10
Number of pages16
Edition1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2021

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