Parasite-specific IgM plays a significant role in the protective immune response to asexual erythrocytic stage Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection

K. N. Couper, R. S. Phillips, F. Brombacher, J. Alexander

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    A comparison of Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection in BALB/c and BALB/c IgM-deficient mice demonstrated a protective role for IgM during infection. IgM-/- mice, unlike μMT mice, display competent B cell humoral immune responses. Increased susceptibility of IgM-/- mice was demonstrated by increased mortality, an advanced ascending infection and higher peak parasitaemia, as well as enhanced anaemia and weight loss compared with wild-type mice. The recrudescent parasitaemias were also higher in the IgM -/- mice. Early specific IgM production in P. chabaudi-infected wild-type mice was followed by IgG1 and IgG2a production, while IgG1 and IgG2a production in IgM-/- mice was preceded by specific IgD production. No protective role for natural IgM against P. chabaudi AS infection was detected as passive transfer of naïve WT serum into IgM-/- mice did not alter the disease outcome or reduce parasite numbers. Passive transfer of WT antiserum, containing predominantly specific IgM, into IgM-/- mice delayed the ascending parasitaemia and reduced mortality. Similarly, coating parasitized red blood cells with WT antiserum, but not IgM-/- antisera, prior to infection also slightly delayed the ascending acute parasitaemia. Specific IgM therefore plays an important role in the limitation of parasite replication during asexual erythrocytic P. chabaudi AS infection. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)171-180
    Number of pages9
    JournalParasite Immunology
    Volume27
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2005

    Keywords

    • IgM
    • Knockout mice
    • Plasmodium chabaudi

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