PARP14 inhibition restores PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor response following IFNϒ-drive acquired resistance in preclinical cancer models

Chun Wai Wong, Christos Evangelou, Kieran N. Sefton, Rotem Leshem, Wei Zhang, Vishaka Gopalan, Sorayut Chattrakarn, Macarena Lucia Fernandez Carro, Erez Uzuner, Holly Mole, Daniel J. Wilcock, Michael P. Smith, Kleita Sergiou, Brian a. Telfer, Dervla T. Isaac, Chang Liu, Nicholas R. Perl, Kerrie Marie, Paul Lorigan, Kaye J. WilliamsPatricia E. Rao, Raghavendar T. Nagaraju, Mario Niepel, Adam F. L. Hurlstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Resistance mechanisms to immune checkpoint blockade therapy (ICBT) limit its response duration and magnitude. Paradoxically, Interferon γ (IFNγ), a key cytokine for cellular immunity, can promote ICBT resistance. Using syngeneic mouse tumour models, we confirm that chronic IFNγ exposure confers resistance to immunotherapy targeting PD-1 (α-PD-1) in immunocompetent female mice. We observe upregulation of poly-ADP ribosyl polymerase 14 (PARP14) in chronic IFNγ-treated cancer cell models, in patient melanoma with elevated IFNG expression, and in melanoma cell cultures from ICBT-progressing lesions characterised by elevated IFNγ signalling. Effector T cell infiltration is enhanced in tumours derived from cells pre-treated with IFNγ in immunocompetent female mice when PARP14 is pharmacologically inhibited or knocked down, while the presence of regulatory T cells is decreased, leading to restoration of α-PD-1 sensitivity. Finally, we determine that tumours which spontaneously relapse in immunocompetent female mice following α-PD-1 therapy upregulate IFNγ signalling and can also be re-sensitised upon receiving PARP14 inhibitor treatment, establishing PARP14 as an actionable target to reverse IFNγ-driven ICBT resistance.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Communications
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 18 Sept 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'PARP14 inhibition restores PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor response following IFNϒ-drive acquired resistance in preclinical cancer models'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this