Patterns of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis following Myodil myelography: the significance of spinal canal stenosis and previous surgery

R Laitt, Alan Jackson, I Isherwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

109 patients who had undergone Myodil myelography on at least one occasion were identified. The patterns of lumbar nerve root distribution in this group were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. The relationship between these patterns and the presence of spinal stenosis or previous surgery was investigated. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditic nerve root patterns were seen in 68 patients and were classified into three groups according to Delemarter et al. Central clumping of nerve roots (type 1) and complete opacification of the thecal sac (type 3), extending over at least one vertebral level, were significantly related to spinal stenosis at an adjacent level (p < 0.0001). Peripheral adhesion of nerve roots to the theca (type 2) was significantly related to previous surgery at the level of abnormality (p < 0.00005). Only a single case of arachnoiditic nerve root patterns was seen in the absence of stenosis or previous surgery. We conclude that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis is significantly related to previous Myodil myelography in the presence of spinal stenosis or previous surgery but that Myodil alone rarely produces these changes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)693-8
Number of pages6
JournalThe British journal of radiology
Volume69
Issue number824
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Arachnoiditis
  • Chronic Disease
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Lumbar Vertebrae
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Myelography
  • Postoperative Complications
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Journal Article

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