Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies behave as DNA damage sensors whose response to DNA double-strand breaks is regulated by NBS1 and the kinases ATM, Chk2, and ATR

Graham Dellaire, Reagan W. Ching, Kashif Ahmed, Farid Jalali, Kenneth C K Tse, Robert G. Bristow, David P. Bazett-Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear body (NB) is a dynamic subnuclear compartment that is implicated in tumor suppression, as well as in the transcription, replication, and repair of DNA. PML NB number can change during the cell cycle, increasing in S phase and in response to cellular stress, including DNA damage. Although topological changes in chromatin after DNA damage may affect the integrity of PML NBs, the molecular or structural basis for an increase in PML NB number has not been elucidated. We demonstrate that after DNA double-strand break induction, the increase in PML NB number is based on a biophysical process, as well as ongoing cell cycle progression and DNA repair. PML NBs increase in number by a supramolecular fission mechanism similar to that observed in S-phase cells, and which is delayed or inhibited by the loss of function of NBS1, ATM, Chk2, and ATR kinase. Therefore, an increase in PML NB number is an intrinsic element of the cellular response to DNA damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-66
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cell Biology
Volume175
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Oct 2006

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Manchester Cancer Research Centre

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