Psychiatric morbidity in patients undergoing heart, heart and lung, or lung transplantation

Anne Trumper, Louis Appleby

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Objectives: To determine the rate of psychiatric disorder in people undergoing heart and/or lung transplantation; to identify the associations of psychiatric disorder in this group. Method: Preoperative assessments were carried out on an 18-month sample of consecutive admissions to a regional unit for heart and lung transplantation in the UK. Assessment included psychiatric morbidity, sexual dysfunction, quality of life, and demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Seventy-six of 79 eligible subjects took part in the assessment. Thirty (39%) were suffering from a psychiatric disorder, the most common being major depressive disorder. Forty-four (58%) reported sexual dysfunction. Clinically significant psychiatric morbidity was associated with a history of treatment for mental disorder, unemployment, and length of physical illness. Patients with psychiatric disorder reported poorer quality of life on the SF-36, with lower scores on subscales for general health perception, social functioning, and energy/vitality. Conclusion: There is a substantial rate of psychiatric disorder in people undergoing heart and/or lung transplantation. Risk is higher in people with a history of psychiatric vulnerability and current illness-related factors. Preoperative psychiatric assessment and intervention in some patients may be a valuable part of their clinical care. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)103-105
    Number of pages2
    JournalJournal of psychosomatic research
    Volume50
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

    Keywords

    • Predictors
    • Psychiatric morbidity
    • Quality of life
    • Transplantation

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