Queer(Y)ing construction: Exploring sexuality and masculinity in construction

Paul W. Chan

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    The macho image of the construction industry often denotes negative aspects of male dominance and female subordination. These have been used to explain the problem of gender imbalance in construction. Proponents of the diversity agenda have sought to tackle structural characteristics of the industry by embracing perspectives of visible minorities in the industry such as women. Thus, the macho image is usually treated as a problem, and rarely problematised. To better understand what the macho image of the industry really entails, there is a need to divert attention away from gendered perspectives of construction towards understanding sexuality as a means of reproducing social relations at the construction workplace. Through life stories of two homosexual men engaging in construction work, hegemonic masculinity and misogyny are explored. Preliminary analysis suggests the potential for a more inclusive notion of masculinity in construction, and a research agenda to rethink gender categories in construction employment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAssociation of Researchers in Construction Management, ARCOM 2011 - Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference|Assoc. Res. Constr. Manage., ARCOM - Proc. Annu. Conf.
    Pages207-216
    Number of pages9
    Volume1
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    Event27th Annual Conference of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management, ARCOM 2011 - Bristol
    Duration: 1 Jul 2011 → …

    Conference

    Conference27th Annual Conference of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management, ARCOM 2011
    CityBristol
    Period1/07/11 → …

    Keywords

    • Equality and diversity
    • Gender
    • Queer theory
    • Sexuality
    • Social relations

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