Relatives of patients with severe psychotic disorders: Factors that influence contact frequency. Report from the UK700 trial

K. Harvey, T. Burns, P. Sedgwick, A. Higgitt, F. Creed, T. Fahy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: The isolation experienced by many patients with severe psychotic disorders is generally assumed to be due to their social withdrawal. An alternative possibility is that relatives avoid frequent contact with patients because they find the situation distressing. Aims: To examine the predictors of frequent patient - relative contact, in particular the role of relatives' experience. Method: UK700 trial data were used to determine baseline predictors of frequent contact and establish whether relatives' experience at baseline predicted continued frequent contact 2 years later. Results: Neither characteristics associated in the literature with relatives' 'burden' nor relatives' experience predicted patient-relative contact frequency. Instead, the predictors were mainly demographic. Conclusions: Many relatives experience considerable distress, but the evidence does not suggest that they avoid frequent contact with the patient as a consequence.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)248-254
    Number of pages6
    JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
    Volume178
    Issue numberMARCH.
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

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