Resilience for family carers of advanced cancer patients—how can health care providers contribute? A qualitative interview study with carers

Ingebrigt Røen, Hans Stifoss-Hanssen, Gunn Grande, Anne-Tove Brenne, Stein Kaasa, Kari Sand, Anne Kari Knudsen

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Resilience for family carers of advanced cancer patients—how can health care providers contribute? A qualitative interview study with carers Show all authors Ingebrigt Røen, Hans Stifoss-Hanssen, Gunn Grande, ... First Published June 1, 2018 Research Article Download PDFPDF download for Resilience for family carers of advanced cancer patients—how can health care providers contribute? A qualitative interview study with carers Article information Article has an altmetric score of 1 Full Access Article Information Article first published online: June 1, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216318777656 Ingebrigt Røen1, 2, Hans Stifoss-Hanssen3, Gunn Grande4, Anne-Tove Brenne1, 5, Stein Kaasa1, 6, Kari Sand1, Anne Kari Knudsen1, 6 1European Palliative Care Research Centre (PRC), Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway 2St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway 3Center of Diakonia and Professional Practice, VID Specialized University, Oslo, Norway 4Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, Manchester, England 5Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway 6Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Corresponding Author: Ingebrigt Røen, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, 4.etg. Kunnskapssenteret Vest, St. Olavs Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. Email: ingebrigt.roen@stolav.no Abstract Background: Caring for advanced cancer patients affects carers’ psychological and physical health. Resilience has been defined as “the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or even significant sources of threat.” Aim: The aim of this study was to explore factors promoting carer resilience, based on carers’ experiences with and preferences for health care provider support. Design: Qualitative, semi-structured, individual interviews with family carers of advanced cancer patients were performed until data saturation. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using systematic text condensation. Setting/participants: Carers (n = 14) of advanced cancer patients, not receiving curative treatment, admitted to an integrated curative and palliative care cancer outpatient clinic or to a university hospital cancer clinic, were included. Results: 14 carers of advanced cancer patients were included; 7 men, 7 women, and mean age of 59 years; 3 were bereaved; 12 were partners; 5 had young and teenage children. Four main resilience factors were identified: (1) being seen and known by health care providers—a personal relation; (2) availability of palliative care; (3) information and communication about illness, prognosis, and death; and (4) facilitating a good carer–patient relation. Conclusion: Health care providers may enhance carers’ resilience by a series of simple interventions. Education should address carers’ support needs and resilience. Systematic assessment of carers’ support needs is recommended. Further investigation is needed into how health care providers can help carers and patients communicate about death.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPalliative Medicine
Volume32
Issue number8
Early online date1 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing

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