Social Networks and Subjective Wellbeing in Australia: New Evidence from a National Survey

X Huang, Mark Western, Yanjie Bian, Yaojun Li, R Côté, H Huang

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Abstract

The article draws on data from a national survey in Australia in 2014 to examine how social networks affect life satisfaction and happiness. Findings show that social network composition, social attachment, perceived social support and the volume of social resources are significantly positively associated with life satisfaction and happiness. Stress about social commitments, feeling restricted by social demands and being excluded by a social group are negatively associated with life satisfaction and happiness. These results indicate that social networks have both ‘bright side’ and ‘dark side’ effects on subjective wellbeing.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSociology
Early online date14 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Australia
  • happiness
  • Life satisfaction
  • Social networks
  • Subjective wellbeing

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Cathie Marsh Institute

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