Strategies to apply soil models directly as friction laws in soil structure interactions

C. Weißenfels, Ajay B Harish, Peter Wriggers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

In this work three different concepts for a direct application of soil models within a frictional contact description are presented. These concepts can be used in conjunction with all different kinds of contact formulations and solution methods. Additionally, all types of plasticity models can be used within these formulations. The advantage of these concepts is shown exemplary in the modeling process of soil-structure interactions where the Ehlers plasticity model for the continuum is now able to describe the soil behavior at the contact surface. The numerical implementation of the new frictional relations is based on the Mortar method and the numerical investigation of a direct shear test shows the reproduction of the typical stress-strain relation of the soil at the contact surface. The work ends with a critical discussion about the different friction formulations and the application of the Ehlers soil model in a direct shear test.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHolistic Simulation of Geotechnical Installation Processes
Subtitle of host publicationTheoretical Results and Applications
EditorsTheodoros Triantafyllidis
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer Nature
Pages216-236
Number of pages21
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9783319525907
ISBN (Print)9783319525891, 9783319849423
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jan 2017

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Applied and Computational Mechanics
PublisherSpringer
Volume82
ISSN (Print)1613-7736
ISSN (Electronic)1860-0816

Keywords

  • contact mechanics
  • finite element method
  • mortar method
  • friction laws
  • contact layer
  • soil mechanics
  • soil-structure interaction
  • projection strategies

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