The Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) data repository: Structural and functional MRI, MEG, and cognitive data from a cross-sectional adult lifespan sample.

Jason R Taylor, Nitin Williams, Rhodri Cusack, Tibor Auer, Meredith A Shafto, Marie Dixon, Lorraine K Tyler, , Richard N Henson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper describes the data repository for the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) initial study cohort. The Cam-CAN Stage 2 repository contains multi-modal (MRI, MEG, and cognitive-behavioural) data from a large (approximately N=700), cross-sectional adult lifespan (18-87years old) population-based sample. The study is designed to characterise age-related changes in cognition and brain structure and function, and to uncover the neurocognitive mechanisms that support healthy cognitive ageing. The database contains raw and preprocessed structural MRI, functional MRI (active tasks and resting state), and MEG data (active tasks and resting state), as well as derived scores from cognitive behavioural experiments spanning five broad domains (attention, emotion, action, language, and memory), and demographic and neuropsychological data. The dataset thus provides a depth of neurocognitive phenotyping that is currently unparalleled, enabling integrative analyses of age-related changes in brain structure, brain function, and cognition, and providing a testbed for novel analyses of multi-modal neuroimaging data.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)262
    Number of pages269
    JournalNeuroImage
    Volume144
    Early online date12 Sep 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 5 Jan 2017

    Keywords

    • Ageing
    • Brain imaging
    • Cognition
    • Data repository
    • Magnetic resonance imaging
    • Magnetoencephalography

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