The design and initial calibration of an optical tracking system using the Microsoft Kinect

Philip J. Noonan, Tim F. Cootes, William A. Hallett, Rainer Hinz

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    Robust motion correction in medical imaging requires accurate and reliable motion tracking. Current systems use devices such as the Polaris Vicra position sensor to monitor the position and orientation of a tracking tool which is fixed to the subject. Although in principle these methods offer high positional accuracy this is lost if the tool slips. Markerless motion tracking aims to track the object directly without the use of markers or a tracking tool. To date these methods have either been unsuccessful or too expensive to have been widely implemented. The Microsoft Kinect is a low cost RGB+D (colour plus depth) video camera. We have used the Kinect to perform motion tracking of a head phantom using a CT of the head as a high resolution template. We present initial results that show the Kinect can track rigid body motion to within
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record|IEEE Nucl. Sci. Symp. Conf. Rec.
    Pages3614-3617
    Number of pages3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    Event2011 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, NSS/MIC 2011 - Valencia
    Duration: 1 Jul 2012 → …

    Conference

    Conference2011 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference, NSS/MIC 2011
    CityValencia
    Period1/07/12 → …

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The design and initial calibration of an optical tracking system using the Microsoft Kinect'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this