The effects of kinesiology taping on experimentally-induced thermal and mechanical pain in otherwise pain-free healthy humans: A randomised controlled repeated-measures laboratory study

Gourav Banerjee, Michelle Briggs, Mark I. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Kinesiology taping (KT) is used to manage musculoskeletal-related pain. There is a paucity of physiological studies evaluating the effect of KT on stimulus-evoked experimental pain. Objective To investigate the effect of KT (applied to lumbar region) on cutaneous somatosensation to noxious and innocuous stimuli in humans with a non-sensitised normally functioning nociceptive system using quantitative sensory testing (QST). Methods Fifty-four participants were randomised to one of three interventions: (i) KT (ii) standard ‘rigid’ taping (ST) (iii) sham taping (ShT). QST measurements were taken at lumbar sites pre-intervention (T1), during-intervention (T2) and during-intervention (T3) in the following sequence: warm-detection-threshold (WDT), heat-pain-threshold (HTPh), heat-pain-tolerance (HPTo), mechanical-detection-threshold (MDT), mechanical-pain-threshold (MPT) and pressure-pain-threshold (PPT). Results Mixed ANOVA revealed statistically significant interaction between Intervention and Time on MDT (p < .0005) and MPT (p < .0005) but not on WDT (p = .09), HPTh (p = .09), HPTo (p = .51) and PPT (p = .52) datasets. There was no significant simple main effect of Intervention on MDT at T2 (p = .68) and T3 (p = .24), and MPT at T2 (p = .79) and T3 (p = .54); post-hoc tests found KT and ST groups had higher (but non-significant) MDT and MPT than the ShT group. There was a significant simple main effect of Time on MDT and MPT for KT (p < .0005) and ST (p < .0005) groups; post-hoc tests found significant increases in MDT and MPT at T3 and T2 compared with T1 in both KT and ST groups. There was no significant simple main effect of Time on MDT (p = .13) nor MPT (p = .08) for the ShT group. Conclusion Taping, irrespective of the elasticity, may modulate cutaneous mechanosensation. KT, ST and ShT seemed to have similar influence on cutaneous thermal and deep pressure nociception.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of kinesiology taping on experimentally-induced thermal and mechanical pain in otherwise pain-free healthy humans: A randomised controlled repeated-measures laboratory study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this