The influence of adult attachment on symptom reporting: Testing a mediational model in a sample of the general population

Christopher J. Armitage, Peter R. Harris

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Research has demonstrated that adult attachment style affects symptom reporting, yet relatively little is known about the variables that mediate this relationship. Participants ( N =202) completed a series of measures designed to tap psychosocial variables associated with both attachment style and symptom reporting, namely, social support, self-esteem, positive affect, negative affect, and emotional expressivity. As predicted, people with secure attachment styles differed significantly from those with insecure attachment styles (i.e., avoidant and anxious/ambivalent) on all dependent variables. Negative affect was the principal mediator of the effects of secure, avoidant, and anxious/ambivalent attachment styles on symptom reporting. The discussion focuses on the practical and theoretical implications of this work, and in particular on the role of negative affect on symptom reporting.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)351-366
    Number of pages15
    JournalPsychology and Health
    Volume21
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

    Keywords

    • Adult attachment
    • Negative affect
    • Positive affect
    • Self-esteem
    • Social support
    • Symptom reporting

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