The moderating effects of coping and self-esteem on the relationship between defeat, entrapment and suicidality in a sample of prisoners at high risk of suicide

Patricia Gooding, Nicholas Tarrier, Graham Dunn, J Shaw, Yvonne Awenat, F Ulph, Daniel Pratt

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Research is sparse which examines pathways to suicide, and resilience to suicide, in people who are particularly vulnerable to suicide, for example, prison inmates. The purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which perceptions of self-esteem and coping ability interacted with defeat and entrapment to both amplify suicidal thoughts and feelings, and to act as a buffer against suicidal thoughts and feelings. METHODS: Participants were 65 male prisoners at high risk of suicide. A cross-sectional questionnaire design was used. Questionnaire measures of depression, defeat, entrapment, self-esteem, coping ability and suicidal probability were administered. RESULTS: For the hopelessness component of the suicide probability measure, high levels of coping ability together with low levels of defeat resulted in the lowest levels of suicidality indicative of a resilience factor. In contrast, low levels of coping skills together with high levels of entrapment were a high risk factor for this hopelessness component of suicide. This pattern of results pertained when controlling for depression levels. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to examine interactions between defeat, entrapment and appraisals of self-esteem and coping ability. Therapeutic interventions would benefit from boosting perceptions and appraisals of coping ability, in particular, in people who are at high risk for suicide.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)988-994
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Psychiatry
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015

Keywords

  • Suicide
  • Prisoners
  • Defeat
  • Entrapment
  • Coping Skills
  • Mental Illness

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