The nature and timing of faunal change in the British Isles across the Pleistocene/Holocene transition

R. Coard, A. T. Chamberlain

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The abrupt change in climate during the last deglaciation is reflected in the British Isles by a transition from periglacial to temperate faunas. In contrast to the coleopteran record, terrestrial mammals characteristic of the Lateglacial persist for several hundred years in southern Britain after the end of the Younger Dryas (Loch Lomond Stadial, end-Pleistocene). This lag in the vertebrate faunal transition could reflect a delay in the Holocene vegetational succession, coupled with a degree of thermal tolerance in cold-adapted mammals. Nonetheless, distinct faunal transitions are seen in the vertebrate records in both southern Britain and southern Ireland, and there do not appear to be transitional faunas containing contemporaneous glacial and temperate species at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)372-376
    Number of pages4
    JournalHolocene
    Volume9
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

    Keywords

    • Early Holocene
    • Lynx
    • Reindeer
    • Southern Ireland
    • Southwest Britain
    • Vertebrate fauna
    • Younger Dryas

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The nature and timing of faunal change in the British Isles across the Pleistocene/Holocene transition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this