The performance of the local lymph node assay with chemicals identified as contact allergens in the human maximization test

D. A. Basketter, E. W. Scholes, I. Kimber

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    For many years, tests in the guinea pig have been the favoured option for the identification of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. However, the mouse has been used widely in immunology research and can represent a viable alternative. A variety of murine assays have been described, including several methods based on ear swelling as an endpoint. Another option is to assess induced lymph node cell proliferation and it is this which forms the basis of the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). The LLNA has undergone several successful interlaboratory validations and compares well with standard guinea pig assays. In the present study, the performance of the LLNA was examined with chemicals tested previously in the human maximization test (HMT). 30 chemicals, 23 of which proved positive in the HMT and seven of which were negative, have been tested. All but four of the materials found positive in the HMT also tested positive in the LLNA. Of these four, sulfanilamide and paraben esters would not classify as skin sensitizers in the guinea pig maximization test and nickel has been found to yield variable results in a number of predictive animal tests. Of the seven substances which proved negative in the HMT, six were also negative in the LLNA, the exception being sodium dodecyl sulfate. These data demonstrate that the LLNA is able to identify accurately chemicals which have the potential to cause significant allergic contact dermatitis in humans. © 1994.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)543-547
    Number of pages4
    JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
    Volume32
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 1994

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