The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor amuvatinib (MP470) sensitizes tumor cells to radio- and chemo-therapies in part by inhibiting homologous recombination

Helen Zhao, Kaisa R. Luoto, Alice X. Meng, Robert G. Bristow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and purpose: RAD51 is a key protein involved in homologous recombination (HR) and a potential target for radiation- and chemotherapies. Amuvatinib (formerly known as MP470) is a novel receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets c-KIT and PDGFRα and can sensitize tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR). Here, we studied amuvatinib mechanism on RAD51 and functional HR. Materials and methods: Protein and RNA analyses, direct repeat green fluorescent protein (DR-GFP) assay and polysomal fractioning were used to measure HR efficiency and global translation in amuvatinib-treated H1299 lung carcinoma cells. Synergy of amuvatinib with IR or mitomycin c (MMC) was assessed by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Amuvaninib inhibited RAD51 protein expression and HR. This was associated with reduced ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation and inhibition of global translation. Amuvatinib sensitized cells to IR and MMC, agents that are selectively toxic to HR-deficient cells. Conclusions: Amuvatinib is a promising agent that may be used to decrease tumor cell resistance. Our work suggests that this is associated with decreased RAD51 expression and function and supports the further study of amuvatinib in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-65
Number of pages7
JournalRadiotherapy and Oncology
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Keywords

  • Amuvatinib
  • DNA double strand break repair
  • Homologous recombination
  • Ionizing radiation
  • Mitomycin C
  • MP470

Research Beacons, Institutes and Platforms

  • Manchester Cancer Research Centre

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