The role of motion in learning new faces

Karen Lander, Vicki Bruce

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Four experiments are reported that investigate the usefulness of rigid (head nodding, shaking) and nonrigid (talking, expressions) motion for establishing new face representations of previously unfamiliar faces. Results show that viewing a face in motion leads to more accurate face learning, compared with viewing a single static image (Experiment 1). The advantage for viewing the face moving rigidly seems to be due to the different angles of view contained in these sequences (Experiment 2). However, the advantage for nonrigid motion is not simply due to multiple images (Experiment 3) and is not specifically linked to forwards motion but extends to reversed sequences (Experiment 4). Thus, although we have demonstrated beneficial effects of motion for face learning, they do not seem to be due to the specific dynamic properties of the sequences shown. Instead, the advantage for nonrigid motion may reflect increased attention to faces moving in a socially important manner.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)897-912
    Number of pages15
    JournalVisual Cognition
    Volume10
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2003

    Keywords

    • RECOGNIZING MOVING FACES; RECOGNITION MEMORY; UNFAMILIAR FACES;
    • FAMOUS FACES; MOVEMENT; INFORMATION; IDENTITIES; FAMILIAR;
    • IMAGES

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