The temporal relationship between speech auditory brainstem responses and the acoustic pattern of the phoneme /ba/ in normal-hearing adults

I. Akhoun, S. Gallégo, A. Moulin, M. Ménard, E. Veuillet, C. Berger-Vachon, L. Collet, H. Thai-Van

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: To investigate the temporal relationship between speech auditory brainstem responses and acoustic pattern of the phoneme /ba/. Methods: Speech elicited auditory brainstem responses (Speech ABR) to /ba/ were recorded in 23 normal-hearing subjects. Effect of stimulus intensity was assessed on Speech ABR components latencies in 11 subjects. The effect of different transducers on electromagnetic leakage was also measured. Results: Speech ABR showed a reproducible onset response (OR) 6 ms after stimulus onset. The frequency following response (FFR) waveform mimicked the 500 Hz low pass filtered temporal waveform of phoneme /ba/ with a latency shift of 14.6 ms. In addition, the OR and FFR latencies decreased with increasing stimulus intensity, with a greater rate for FFR (-1.4 ms/10 dB) than for OR (-0.6 ms/10 dB). Conclusions: A close relationship was found between the pattern of the acoustic stimulus and the FFR temporal structure. Furthermore, differences in latency behaviour suggest different generation mechanisms for FFR and OR. Significance: The results provided further insight into the temporal encoding of basic speech stimulus at the brainstem level in humans. © 2007 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)922-933
    Number of pages11
    JournalClinical Neurophysiology
    Volume119
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

    Keywords

    • Auditory brainstem response
    • Consonant-vowels
    • Frequency following response
    • Periodicity
    • Speech processing
    • Temporal coding

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