The use of concept maps during knowledge elicitation in ontology development processes - The nutrigenomics use case

Alexander Garcia Castro, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Robert Stevens, Chris Taylor, Karim Nashar, Mark A. Ragan, Susanna Assunta Sansone

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: Incorporation of ontologies into annotations has enabled 'semantic integration' of complex data, making explicit the knowledge within a certain field. One of the major bottlenecks in developing bio-ontologies is the lack of a unified methodology. Different methodologies have been proposed for different scenarios, but there is no agreed-upon standard methodology for building ontologies. The involvement of geographically distributed domain experts, the need for domain experts to lead the design process, the application of the ontologies and the life cycles of bio-ontologies are amongst the features not considered by previously proposed methodologies. Results: Here, we present a methodology for developing ontologies within the biological domain. We describe our scenario, competency questions, results and milestones for each methodological stage. We introduce the use of concept maps during knowledge acquisition phases as a feasible transition between domain expert and knowledge engineer. Conclusion: The contributions of this paper are the thorough description of the steps we suggest when building an ontology, example use of concept maps, consideration of applicability to the development of lower-level ontologies and application to decentralised environments. We have found that within our scenario conceptual maps played an important role in the development proces. © 2006 Castro et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number267
    JournalBMC Bioinformatics
    Volume7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 25 May 2006

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The use of concept maps during knowledge elicitation in ontology development processes - The nutrigenomics use case'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this