Use of wearable devices among individuals with depression and anxiety: A population level study

Henry Onyeaka, Chioma Muoghalu, Mwamba Malekani, Crystal Obi Azuike, Precious Obehi Eseaton, Oghenetega E. Ayisire, Somto V. Enemuo, Tajudeen Basiru, John Paul Omuojine, Charles Ezeaka, Joseph Firth, John Torous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Although previous research suggests that wearable devices (WD) are feasible and readily acceptable among mental health populations, there is a scarcity of national United States (US) data on the key factors related to the adoption of WD among people with mental disorders. This study aims to examine rates of WD adoption and identify factors associated with the use and willingness to share WD data among a national sample of adults with depression and/or anxiety in the US. Methods: Data were obtained from the 2019 and 2020 iteration of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with WD adoption and willingness to share WD data with clinicians. Results: Of the 2,021 adults with depression and/or anxiety, 30.8% endorsed past 12-month use of WD and of these, 85.9% of WD users indicated their willingness to share their WD data with clinicians. Significant predictors of WD adoption and willingness to share WD data with clinicians include age, gender, education status, and previous experience with technology. Conclusions: About 1 in 3 adults with depression use WD. However, several sociodemographic and technology factors may limit large scale integration of these tools in mental health delivery.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100081
JournalPsychiatry Research Communications
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Data sharing
  • Digital disparities
  • Mental disorder
  • Wearable devices

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