Vaccination with tumor cells engineered to secrete interleukin 2-immunoglobulin G fusion protein induces tumor rejection

S Bulfone-Paus, H von Bernuth, R Rückert, J Wachtlin, D Ungureanu, M Notter, H Krause, T Pohl, R Paus, U Kunzendorf

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Here we provide proof that the injection of tumor cells engineered to secrete interleukin 2 (IL-2)-IgG chimeric proteins locally induces potent antitumor responses, which are more effective than tumor transfection with IL-2 alone. Murine plasmacytoma cells (J558L) were stably transfected with DNA coding for a human IL-2-IgG1 or a murine IL-2-IgG2b fusion protein and were injected s.c. into syngeneic BALB/c mice. Evaluation of tumor growth and rejection patterns showed that IL-2-IgG secretion by transfected J558L tumor cells induced their rejection in all animals tested, similar to the rejection of J558L cells engineered to secrete IL-2 alone, whereas treatment with parental cells was lethal. However, mice treated with IL-2-IgG-secreting J558L cells (human IL-2-IgG1 and murine IL-2-IgG2b) exhibited a significantly stronger tumor immunity against a later challenge with parental J558L cells than mice treated with IL-2-secreting tumor cells.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2707-10
    Number of pages4
    JournalCancer Research
    Volume58
    Issue number13
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 1998

    Keywords

    • Animals
    • Graft Rejection
    • Humans
    • Immunoglobulin G
    • Interleukin-2
    • Mice
    • Mice, Inbred BALB C
    • Neoplasm Transplantation
    • Plasmacytoma
    • Recombinant Fusion Proteins
    • Transfection
    • Vaccination

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