What do people labelled with learning difficulties think about their access to direct payments?

Rosalind Clare Chapman, Carlisle People First Research Team

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    Abstract

    There is evidence from a range of sources that people labelled with learning difficulties, in using direct payments, are able to take more control of their lives. But the Carlisle People First Research team, through contacts in self advocacygroups, have heard a number of stories from colleagues about difficulties faced in accessing direct payments. We felt it was an area we wanted to explore.The team were commissioned by the Disability Association of Carlisle and Eden to undertake a research project on finding out about people’s views.The growing importance of personal budgets and the option of direct payments is, we believe, a good thing. But a lot of people who have the label of learning difficulties may have to take on a bigger role in understanding, organising andmanaging their own care. The choices involved in this can be difficult, and we hope professionals can listen to some of the concerns people feel about their access to direct payments.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)30-33
    JournalLearning disability Today: Research Unpacked
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

    Keywords

    • Direct Payments; inclusive research; support; people first; advocacy

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