What motivates and de-motivates Caucasian and South Asian older adults to perform regular exercise and physical activity in general and in relation to fall prevention?

M Horne, S Speed, DA Skelton, C. Todd

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

    Abstract

    Introduction: The primary aims of this research study were to investigate the uptake and adherence of exercise & physical activity and exercise for fall prevention in 60-70 year old Caucasian and South Asian community dwellers by examining: [1] cultural influences and [2] identifying salient attitudes and beliefs that drive or hinder this uptake and adherence. Methods: An ethnographic approach – participant observation, 15 focus group discussions (n = 87; mean age = 65.74 yrs) and 40 semi-structured interviews (mean age = 64.83 yrs). Framework analysis was used for data analysis and classification. Results: Three main themes were identified: [1] Motivation – socialisation, general health, maintaining independence, weight reduction, longevity, re-establish identity and ‘normality’ after retirement/ bereavement, enjoyment, keeping up with the family and longevity. [2] Barriers – actual and perceived poor health, lack of confidence and motivation, lack of support, no encouragement to remain or become physical fit and active & carer issues. [3] Beliefs around fall prevention. Discussion: Older people are not generally motivated to perform physical activity on a regular basis purely to help prevent falls. Social support and the social element of physical activity appear to be key motivators to the uptake of physical activity. Enjoyment, increased self-confidence and maintaining social networks appear to be important motivators in terms of adherence. Health appears to be a secondary motivator in terms of adherence. What is new: [1] Fall prevention should not be the focus of marketing strategies but the peripheral benefits of exercise/physical activity. [2] Depression is a barrier to the uptake of exercise/physical activity that does not seem to be picked up on by health care professionals and can be a potent barrier to the uptake of exercise/physical activity. What is important: There are more similarities then dissimilarities in motivational and de-motivational factors between Caucasian and South Asian older adults.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - May 2007

    Keywords

    • Attitudes; beliefs; execise; physical activity; fall prevention; older adults; cultural influences

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