Who Self-Weighs and What Do They Gain From It? A Retrospective Comparison Between Smart Scale Users and the General Population in England.

Matthew Sperrin, Helen Rushton, William G Dixon, Alexis Normand, Joffrey Villard, Angela Chieh, Iain Buchan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Digital self-monitoring, particularly of weight, is increasingly prevalent. The associated data could be reused for clinical and research purposes. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to compare participants who use connected smart scale technologies with the general population and explore how use of smart scale technology affects, or is affected by, weight change. METHODS: This was a retrospective study comparing 2 databases: (1) the longitudinal height and weight measurement database of smart scale users and (2) the Health Survey for England, a cross-sectional survey of the general population in England. Baseline comparison was of body mass index (BMI) in the 2 databases via a regression model. For exploring engagement with the technology, two analyses were performed: (1) a regression model of BMI change predicted by measures of engagement and (2) a recurrent event survival analysis with instantaneous probability of a subsequent self-weighing predicted by previous BMI change. RESULTS: Among women, users of self-weighing technology had a mean BMI of 1.62 kg/m(2) (95% CI 1.03-2.22) lower than the general population (of the same age and height) (P
Original languageEnglish
JournalJOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • body mass index
  • body weight
  • connected health technologies
  • self-monitoring
  • weight gain
  • weight loss

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