Why have sustained increases in obesity and type 2 diabetes not offset declines in cardiovascular mortality over recent decades in Western countries?

Simon Capewell, Iain Buchan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The majority of Western countries have reported large falls in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) mortality rates since the 1970s. Yet since the 1980s, they have also experienced two-fold or three-fold increases in the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes - both considered substantial risk factors for CVD. So why have these increasing risks apparently not impacted on CVD mortality falls? This viewpoint outlines the main factors involved; examines recent trends and apparent contradictions; offers some explanations for the trends; discusses how more usefully complex epidemiological models might lead to clearer evidence; offers some explanations for the trends; and explores the implications for CVD prevention. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)307-311
    Number of pages4
    JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
    Volume22
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

    Keywords

    • Cardiovascular
    • Mortality
    • Obesity
    • Trends
    • Type 2 diabetes
    • Western countries

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Why have sustained increases in obesity and type 2 diabetes not offset declines in cardiovascular mortality over recent decades in Western countries?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this