The effect of Person-centred care (PCC) interventions on staff behaviour in health and social care settings

  • Daniel Blake

Student thesis: Doctor of Clinical Psychology

Abstract

The aim of this thesis was to explore and evaluate interventions which aim to increase staff person-centred care behaviour in health and social care settings. The thesis consists of 3 papers; paper 1 is a systematic literature review which examines the content, focus, and effectiveness of PCC interventions in dementia care, paper 2 is an empirical study which explores the effectiveness of Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) in neurorehabilitation settings, and paper 3 is a critical reflection on the research process. For paper one, 6 databases were systematically searched and 33 studies were included in the review. The search identified 10 different types of PCC intervention that can be delivered in dementia care environments to improve staff PCC behaviour. The effectiveness of these interventions is explored and each study is rated for methodological quality. Conclusions are drawn including the strengths and limitations of the review and implications for health and social care environments and future studies. For paper two, a feasibility study was conducted using a cluster randomised controlled trial design. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine the feasibility of a larger trial being conducted and gather some provisional evidence regarding the effectiveness of DCM in increasing PCC behaviour. Staff were receptive to the intervention suggesting feasibility of future trials. However, a number of barriers were identified and one of the experimental wards could not receive the intervention as planned. PCC behaviour did not increase in the experimental group but declined in the control group over time. A potential mechanism of effect for DCM in this setting is discussed. Paper 3 is a critical reflection on the whole research process. It includes a review of the strengths and limitations of each paper and considers personal reflections of the trainee.
Date of Award31 Dec 2017
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Manchester
SupervisorKatherine Berry (Supervisor) & Laura Brown (Supervisor)

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